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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
enemy america has -- at is our first president, george washington. >> i think george washington said this when he was up in massachusetts in the beginning of december 1775 or maybe late november. communications were slow in these days. washington, in the point in time, probably the most recent things he knew about done more -- about dunmore was probably as close to the peak of his power in virginia because ultimately he was chased out of virginia. but during the summer and fall of 1775, he was very effective in sending out troops to read plantations. -- to read plantations. he was during of the indians. they could find refuge and get the fleet of the british army. even stirred up the instruction of indentured servants. not only did look like he might succeed, but there were rumors that he would ascend the party in the area of alexandria, va irginia. george washington is up there in massachusetts were about his wife. even thomas jefferson were about his wife at the same time. and i put that in. i did not dwell on it. i think it is a footnote or something like that. but washington had
was afraid if they could not hold america, the dominoes will fall elsewhere in the british empire. he was wrong about that and he was wrong about a lot. he was a bad decision maker for the british government in the early years. but to blame it all on him would be a great mistake. >> what is your take on the 16 points that were made by thomas jefferson in the virginia constitution and therefore the declaration of independence? >> that is all this stuff about george iii being an ogre and being responsible for everything. that was dressed up for very good reason. if you were urging a revolution, and by political theory of the era, you could overthrow a tyrant. overthrowing a tyrant was ok, it was not a civil war. it was something that had greater justification. in order to make the case they needed heading into the period of wanting to be credible to the other nations so they could gain from france or spain, and this was another reason for the declaration of independence, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. sonya, with all these arguments about what he did. that is where tempe
jarrett in for bill hemmer here in "america's newsroom.". >> i'm heather childers in for martha maccallum the senate gavels in at 11:00 a.m. we'll see if there was some miracle overnight. gregg: i doubt that. yesterday, republican senate leader mitch mcconnell made an emergency call to the vice president joe biden in an evident to jump-start negotiations. heather: if no deal is haed out today, majority leader reid says he will call a vote on a separate white house plan that reflects's original proposal. gregg: chief correspondent mike emanuel kicks off the coverage. mike, where do the things stand in the fiscal cliff talks at this critical late-stage? >> reporter: gregg, there seems to be some hope that conversations between vice president joe biden and senator mitch mcconnell can produce a deal. aides say the two men spoke multiple times last night and will continue working toward a solution. mcconnell called the vice. president bush: after weighing 18 hours from senate majority leader harry reid who seemed to throw in the towel. >> there is still significant difference between two
not hold america, the dominoes will fall in the rest of the british empire. he was a bad decision maker for the british government in the early years. to blame it all on him would be a mistake. >> what is your take on the 16 points that were made by thomas jefferson in the virginia constitution and then the declaration of independence? >> all that stuff about george iii being an ogre and responsible for everything, if your urging a revolution, by political theory, you could overthrow retired. -- a tyrant. overthrowing a tyrant would be a good thing. in order to make the case they needed heading into wanting to be credible to the other nations, such as france or spain whatever, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. so he came up with all of these arguments about what he did and that is with jefferson did. >> what did you think? >> i was not a big jeffersonian after i did all of this. he was a wordsmith. he was not a good executive when he was governor of virginia. he was not able to organize effective resistance. he wasn't famous until he was famous in the sense that we know his
be for a number of things. not only are we talking about america, we are talking about the world when we fail to do things we need to do. but for the moment, the issue of the day has to do with an adequate discussion on talks of the american people about just what we need to do regarding this measure. we cannot do everything, and i know that. we cannot stop evil and violence by educating everything, but in my judgment we can and we must do something. failure to do that is a helluva lot more important to me than whether the president and john boehner jump off a fiscal cliff. >> it did yeoman yields back. mr. bishop. -- the gentleman yields back. >> let me first say, mr. scott, that the shawl is specific for you. it is designed to match the wheelchair and the walker you will be given in the senate. in my years as speaker of the house -- [laughter] 1 of the things i had to do is try to enforce the rules we had in quorum in debate. i just want you to know that first ball, i don't ascribe to any special powers to see into the heart of other people so i cannot prescribe motives to anybody or how th
, lake -- [inaudible] actually it's a wonderful part of america. here we have two chinese immigrant families representing america. it's hard to imagine it in reverse from the chinese side. but then they are not in the great society. >> do they take it as an honor? >> and deep. as ambassador locke mentioned they want to claim him and steve chu as part of the greater chinese community when they start talking about human rights or disagree with him on climate change. but nonetheless it's an amazing moments in american history. >> you went over there just before or just after the big confrontation in august of 2011 over the debt crisis here and there is so much concern whether china would continue to surface our debts and by our investment, treasury bond. i was just wondering, what is the mayor theo up our political system is working and whether our economy, whether we are a worthy partner i guess. >> abuse in the top chinese government leaders as they have great confidence in the economy and know how strong it is. they've made statements to the south american leaders that have gone all
the kingdom of heaven. >> difficult images, difficult words for these dark days in america. we begin this afternoon as the first of many funerals are held in newtown, connecticut. the beginning of what will prove to be a parade of ceremonies laying to rest beautiful young children and their dedicated young teachers who became the victims of a senseless and unspeakable act of violence. children like 6-year-old noah pozner, smart as a whip, gentle but rambunctious, mourned by his twin sister ariel who was in a different classroom and survived. jack pinto, also 6, loved skiing, baseball, and football and was a big fan of the new york giants, especially victor cruz. the star receiver wore the boy's name on his cleats and gloves in tribute during the giants game sunday night. as a nation grapples with how and why these many young lives were cut brutally short, it fell to the president in newtown last night to face the impossible task of consoling a town that lay in emotional ruins. >> i can only hope it helps for you to know that the you're not alone in your grief. that our world, too, ha
that to america where 45% of the total population gets out of bed and goes to work. according to the wall street journal, in greece total economic activity is down 20% in the past four years. this is a country in financial ruin. the question, how can a country of 11 million repay a 1/2 trillion dollars worth of debt and it's hard to think they could ever recover. heart breaking for someone of greek heritage like our own nicole petallides, it's a dreadful siiuation. >> it is heart breaking and i was hoping, glad you didn't make me do it, trying to throw greece under the bus. the truth is the country is suffering greatly. and grandparents trying to support their sons, daughters, grandchildren all on one pension and many of europeans, they have a different mentality, in certain ways, retiring, off the government and that's not the greeks here in the states, willing to work 25 hours a day. and there's certainly a different mentality there, but they are suffering greatly. one gentleman, nobody talks, but the cemetery, very sad and solemn. stuart: that's a personal side % of the greek tragedy story. n
in history and we all know it on so many different fronts, he changed the way america thinks. and it's quite a gift that he had, that he gave to the country. so for both of them, it has been just an enormous privilege for all of us to serve with you. and i think everyone on both sides of the aisle know there was greatness in our delegation and that it was an honor, john and barney, to have been able to serve with you. and thank you so much. and i yield back the balance of my time. mr. burton: madam speaker, let me just follow up on what was just said and say that barney frank and i had a lot of differences over the years, but we also found times we could work together and we co-sponsored a bill together one time. barney and your colleague, i wish you both the very best and hopefully we will run into each other. let me make a couple of comments to my two colleagues who are going to follow me on this special order who told me if i talked too long they will hit me in the head with a ball bat. i want to say a couple of things. daniel inouye, senator inouye, i never met, but i read in the paper m
. i want to turn to paul barrett, who we had on yesterday's, author of "bloch: the rise of america's gun." i asked about senator feinstein's announcement that she will reintroduce the ban on assault weapons on the first of the senate. >> i will read the legislation very closely when it is out. i have to say i'm skeptical. the 1994 so-called assault weapons ban was one of the most porous, ineffective pieces of legislation that i personally have the opportunity to study. it was shot through with loopholes. it had no applicability to weapons that were made and sold on the day before enactment. and the fact it was coming for a period of years gave gun manufacturers an opportunity to run their factories overtime and to build up huge stockpiles of the weapons. so we will see. but if congress is not proposing to ban weapons that are already out there, then that leaves millions and millions of weapons already out there. >> that was paul barrett, author of "glock: the rise of america's gun." rebecca peters, if you could compare to the legislation that was passed in australia after the massa
at the white house with just four days left until the deadline. >> they called him stormin norman. america remembering general norman schwarzkopf. >> and have gun, will teach. hundreds of educators get a hands-on lesson in firearms. controversial proposal. good morning. welcome to "early start." 5:00 a.m. in the east. >>> it is the last friday of 2012. i've just had that pointed out to us. one final desperate attempt to dodge the fiscal cliff, just four days left before we go over the edge triggers tax hikes, spending cuts that could send the nation back into recession. the president calling for members of the congress the back. a gang of six attending. vice president biden, harry reid, house minority leader nancy pelosi, mitch mcconnell and john boehner representing the republicans. brianna keilar is live from washington. is anybody optimistic that a deal could be done today around a table? >> i will tell you the optimism is sort of sinking. senate majority leader harry reid said he doesn't see how it can get done by january 1st. we heard from president obama before he left from his vacat
this morning." ñp that ended america's most infamous family feud. the hat fooelds and the mccoys. researchers have now found the first physical remains of the final battle. mark strassmann has the exclusive look of the evidence that could rewrite the history of these hillbilly clans. >> reporter: in these east kentucky hills bob scott's family has owned this land, almost 50 acres, since 1902. it was a stage for a bloody chapter in american history that's also part of his family history, the hatfield/mccoy feud. >> my mother's maiden name was hatfield. >> and this is mccoy property. >> randall mccoy, pate trat of the kentucky clan once lived here and his well sit here's on scott's land. his once enemy was hatfield, leader of the clan. this spot is where they finally ended a generation of fussin', fightin', and killing. sparked by a murder right after the civil war. >> mccoy's brother was a northern soldier. he comes back from the war. hatfield and his family fought for the south. word gout out they were out to get him and they eventually went out and get him. >> reporter: between 1865 and 1868
impact of latino generation. panelists include former white house advisor to latin -- latin america, executive director of the latino partnership for conservative principles, and arizona state university professor rodolfo espinoza. this event is two hours. >> good morning. we will go ahead and get started. welcome to the wilson center. this is, as you well know, a place where public policy and a research me to bring together the world of ideas with your world a policy action. very happy to have our director of the latin-american program. and of course, very pleased that this is an event we are co- sponsoring with immigration works that did most of the work for this. the president of emigration works really put the panel together, as well as very proud to co-concert arizona university. i want to acknowledge a senior scholar at the woodrow wilson center. and many other good friends here. good to see dan and rubber co and many others at the woodrow wilson center. there is no doubt the latino vote was important past election. we did not know how important this would be when we started t
. regulators are set to issue heavy fines this week. reuters suggest that authorities in america, britain and possibly japan will fine the swiss bank in excess of $1 billion for its part in the fixing of the rate. carolin rejoins us with more on this story. >> hey there, ross. if you believe press reports from swiss daily over the weekend, that fine could be much more than just $1 billion. it was suggested it could be $1.5 billion swiss francs or $1.6 billion. that would be a massive fine if that's confirmed and it would be much, much higher than what analysts had anticipated. three times the amount that barclay's paid over the summer and remember that ubs cooperated quite closely with authorities over the last two years and received conditional immunity from some of the regulators. that's why analysts believed that the fine would be considerably lower than that which barclay's paid. it does suggest that ubs may be the worst offender. as pat of the deal, according to a couple of press reports, ross, this is quite interesting. it says that ubs will even admit to criminal wrongdoing in its
. he urges "washington politics" to not get in the way of "america's progress." meanwhile, in the republican address, missouri senator roy blunt says the nation can avoid going over the fiscalbama and the democratic- controlled senate work with republicans to solve the problem. >> the senate has approved a 60-point-4 billion dollar emergency spending package for hurricane sandy recovery. the measure, which was backed by democrats, now heads to the house. meanwhile, republican leaders favor a smaller aid package to pay for immediate sandy recovery needs, saying they need more time to consider any additional aid. >> sandy battered the east coast in late october. it was the most costly natural disaster since hurricane katrina in 2005. >> a connecticut attorney is asking permission to sue the state for 100 million dollars on behalf of a student who survived the mass shooting in newtown. the attorney says the 6- year-old student, identified as "jill doe," was in her classroom at sandy hook elementary school on december 14th when suspected gunman adam lanza opened fire. lanza ki
predict america will go back into a recession. >> here's what will happen starting tomorrow. income taxes would increase $2,400 a year for families with an annual income of $50,000 to $75,000. their social security taxes would also go up on average $1,000 a year. and some 2 million jobless americans stand to lose their fed caleral unemployment benefits. in all, the congressional budget office says going over the cliff could cost the country more than 3 million jobs in 2013. we begin our coverage with nancy cordes on capitol hill. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. the senate is set to reconvene in about an hour. we're told negotiations progressed well last night, that the vice president is now heavily involved and that the two sides have moved significantly towards one another on the top issue, which is tax cuts. but the big question is whether they can make it the rest of the way before tonight's deadline. senators filled the halls sunday hoping they'd have a deal to vote on, but just before 6:00, the senate leader sent them home. >> there's still significan
about the u.s. treasury markets and how low yields are across the curve. high yield, corporate america, still around 6.5% and loans are around 5% and a more short duration assets. she should be trading at the higher end of the market. >>> when when we talked to david tepper, he said equities are the better value at this point. would you agree with that? >> yeah. i think if we get past this fiscal plan, all likelihood is next year will be a positive year. think about what can drive equity returns next year, it will be more about multiple expansion. he think there will be some leverage growth. where are you going the drive equity returns will be if multiples increase and really drive equity valuations. the high yield market in a lower growth stable market is going to get you good, stable returns with a lot less volatility. we do like some equities here, but we also like the credit markets and the loan markets. >> kevin, why doebts you weigh in on where things stand right now. we know what the fed is doing at this point. if washington gets its act together and we see some sort of an agree
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)